Plantation

Site Type curated by: The African American Historic Sites Database Team

Plantations in Virginia

Locations for Site Type

Historical Significance Ashlawn-Highland was the plantation home of the fifth president of the United states, James Monroe, for a quarter of a century. Purchased in 1793, at the entreaty of Thomas Jefferson who wished to "create a society to our…

Historical Significance In 1776, George Hairston, a wealthy tobacco planter and one of the largest slaveholders in 18th-century Virginia, founded Beaver Creek Plantation near what is now the city of Martinsville. Enslaved men, women, and children…

Historical Significance Formerly a plantation owned by Philip St. George Cocke, son of General John Hartwell Cocke of Bremo, Belmead was purchased in 1893 by Colonel and Mrs. Edward de Vaux Morrell of Philadelphia to establish a school for…

Historical Significance On the morning of August 23, 1831, Belmont was the site of the next-to-last skirmish in the Nat Turner insurrection, the bloodiest and best-known slave revolt in American history. Beginning at the Travis plantation on the…

Historical Significance The Ben Venue slave quarters form perhaps the most architecturally sophisticated grouping of slave quarters surviving in Virginia. Similar in style to the "big house," the quarters are brick buildings in contrast to the more…

Historical Significance The Berry Hill Estate was originally part of a 105,000-acre tract granted by the English Crown in 1728 to William Byrd II and was one of Virginia's largest and most prosperous plantations. Enslaved African Americans worked…

Historical Significance The Booker T. Washington National Monument commemorates the birthplace of this noted educator, orator, author, and advisor to presidents. The enslaved Washington lived with his mother, brother, and sister in a cabin on the…

Historical Significance The Bremo Historic District includes the three estates created by General John Hartwell Cocke, a leading opponent of slavery. The focal point of the district is Upper Bremo, the Palladian-style mansion completed in 1820 as…

Historical Significance Chippokes Plantation, one of the oldest continuously farmed plantations in the country, has retained its original boundaries since it was established in 1619. A 1400-acre farm located opposite Jamestown Island, Chippokes…

Historical Significance Nat Turner's slave rebellion began at Courtland. The militia suppressed slaves after 60 whites were killed. See entry for Belmont Plantation. Physical Description This is a private home with a public marker describing the…

Historical Significance Eppington was built circa 1770 by Francis Eppes VI, Thomas Jefferson's brother-in-law and cousin to Martha Jefferson. Eppes married Martha's sister Elizabeth Wayles. The two families, Jefferson and Eppes, were close; when…

Historical Significance The Gilmore cabin was built in 1873 by George Gilmore, an emancipated African American who had been enslaved on the Montpelier estate, the home of President James Madison. The cabin stands on land that once belonged to Dr.…

Historical Significance The Fairfield Foundation is conducting a long-term archaeological study of the Burwell plantation in Gloucester County, Virginia. Fairfield, or Carter's Creek Farm, as it was often known, was the ancestral plantation of the…

Historical Significance Green Spring Plantation was the home of Virginia Governor William Berkeley and ancestral home of the Ludwells and Lees. This historic plantation houses exhibits depicting the lives of the Africans and African American men,…

Historical Significance Perhaps none of the founders better exemplified the paradox of American liberty and American slavery than did George Mason, who lived at Gunston Hall from 1759 until his death in 1792. The author of the first state bill of…

Historical Significance The Hairston family was one of the largest slave owning families in colonial and pre-Civil War Virginia. Starting in 1730, when Peter Hairston and his four sons arrived from Scotland, the Hairstons amassed a vast tobacco…

Historical Significance Located on the upper James River, the first owner of Howard's Neck Plantation patented 732 acres of land in 1714. The focal point of the plantation is the mansion of a later owner, a Richmond milling industry leader, Edward…

Historical Significance The first European settlers to inhabit Shuter's Hill were the Mills family. John Mills, a merchant, constructed the first known historical residence on the property in 1781. His plantation relied on the labor of nine enslaved…

Historical Significance Hannah Valentine and Lethe Jackson were house slaves at Montcalm, the family home of David and Mary Campbell, constructed in Abingdon in 1827. Hannah and Lethe were left to care for Montcalm during the years David Campbell…

Historical Significance Located on a small mountain outside Charlottesville, Virginia, Monticello was the home of Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, third president of the United States, and founder of the University of…

Historical Significance Due to to George Washington's conscientious record-keeping and his prominence in American history, Mount Vernon is one of the best-documented plantations in the United States. Initially acquired by Washington's…

Historical Significance The grounds of Piney Grove at Southall's Plantation include the 1835 Dower Quarter - a well-preserved, two - room frame slave quarter. Physical Description "Piney Grove at Southall's Plantation" is a museum of plantation…

Historical Significance Prestwould Plantation was built for Sir Peyton Skipwith and Jean Miller Skipwith after their marriage in 1788. Prestwould was among the largest plantations in the state. The papers and records kept by the Skipwiths provide…

Historical Significance Enslaved labor was essential to the functioning of Shirley Plantation. African Americans tended the fields, harvested the crops, maintained the house, cooked the meals, and provided the majority of skilled labor, including…

Historical Significance Stratford Hall was the home of four generations of the Lee family, which included two signers of the Declaration of Independence, and was the birthplace of General Robert E. Lee. The plantation currently encompasses nearly…

Historical Significance Sweet Briar College is located on the former Sweet Briar Plantation site, home of Elijah Fletcher and his descendants. Elijah Fletcher was born in 1789 in Ludlow, Vermont. In 1810 he traveled to Virginia to teach at New…

Historical Significance Poplar Forest, Thomas Jefferson's plantation retreat and architectural masterpiece, offers insight into the community of enslaved workers that took shape on the property during Jefferson's 54 years of ownership. Many of these…